instagram: Scenes From Above with Highliner @carlmarrs To see…


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instagram:

Scenes From Above with Highliner @carlmarrs

To see more of Carl’s highline views, follow @carlmarrs on Instagram.

“It’s like, ‘Yeah I’m out here balancing on a one-inch-wide [2.5 cm] band of nylon fibers above a great drop, and I feel really good about it. Yeah, I like this. This is good.’” Welcome to the inner-dialogue of Carl Marrs (@carlmarrs), a 23-year-old climber and highliner from Seattle. Highlining is slacklinging – walking on webbing that is fixed to two anchors – but at elevation. “I think it’s cool that as human beings our mind has the power to transform a situation from something dangerous into something exhilarating,” Carl says. But before ever becoming attracted to the adrenaline of great heights, Carl was inspired by the photographs of climbers and highliners he admired.

Carl started climbing with high school friends in 2010 and later discovered a passion for slacklining during a trip with to Yosemite, the site where some believe slacklining was invented. “I’ve slacklined as much as possible since then and don’t see any signs of slowing down,” he says. Through slacklining, Carl has found more than just an athletic challenge with amazing views. He has found belonging in a vibrant community. “The times I’ve spent at highline festivals surrounded by the tribe are the best of my life,” Carl says.

While Carl enjoys being out on the ropes with fellow athletes as well as sharing his photographs with a diverse community, he also values the meditative and solitary feeling he gets out in the wilderness. “The best moments come when I’m out in the middle of a highline, comfortably balancing, feeling a light breeze blow by and hearing nothing but the calls of swooping birds echoing through the canyons hundreds of feet below me.”